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Nestlé Toll House Rolls Out Edible Cookie Dough In Two Flavors

Toll House edible cookie dough

Nestlé Toll House has released Edible Cookie Dough, a ready-to-eat treat that is safe to eat right out of the tub.

Toll House edible cookie doughThe new Edible Cookie Dough has two flavors: Chocolate Chip (inspired by the classic recipe) and Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Monster.

“We know cookie dough is hard to resist, so we wanted to bring the experience of eating cookie dough straight from the mixer to consumers in a safe and convenient way,” said Christyna Chandler, associate brand manager of the Arlington, Virginia-based company.

Made with the same ingredients used at home such as real butter and 100 percent real chocolate, Nestle Toll House  Chocolate Chip Edible Cookie Dough contains no preservatives, artificial colors or artificial flavors. Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Monster Cookie Dough combines peanut butter, oats and candy-coated chocolate and contains no artificial flavors. 

Baking this product is not recommended as it was formulated specifically to be eaten right out of the tub. In order to be safe to consume in this way, Nestle removed ingredients, such as eggs, that are important for the baking process.

The Edible Cookie Dough is available in the refrigerated section near cookie dough. It retails at a suggested retail price of $5.49 for a 15-oz. tub. Toll House edible cookie dough

Nestle Toll House has provided chocolate chips for more than 80 years.

American entrepreneurs George and Charles Page from Lee County, Illinois, built Europe’s first condensed milk factory in 1866 when they founded the Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company. When the company merged with rival Henri Nestlé, who in 1867 began selling his life-saving infant cereal in Vevey, Switzerland, the Nestlé and Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company was born. Since then, Nestlé in the U.S. has contributed to the growth, innovation and success that has defined the global company for more than 150 years.

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