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Buc-ee’s Partners With Texas DOT To Fight Litter In State

Texas DOT + Buc-ee's

Convenience store chain Buc-ee’s is teaming with the Texas Department of Transportation to battle litter in Texas.

In August, drivers in Texas started seeing billboards featuring the department’s “Don’t mess with Texas” and Buc-ee’s, along major travel routes to remind drivers to keep trash inside their cars.

Drivers also will see reminders of the campaign at Buc-ee’s stores across Texas, including the famous “Don’t mess with Texas” trash barrels, cross-branded merchandise and signage educating visitors to properly dispose of trash to keep Texas litter-free.

Texas DOT + Buc-ee's“Buc-ee’s and ‘Don’t mess with Texas’ represent two iconic brands that are each as big as Texas,” said Texas Transportation Commission Chairman J. Bruce Bugg, Jr. “We’re excited to work with Buc-ee’s to remind its millions of customers and everyone who sees its iconic billboards that ‘Don’t mess with Texas’ really means don’t litter.”

The collaboration between “Don’t mess with Texas” and Buc-ee’s will also extend into the community. The two are teaming up on education initiatives shared in schools to teach younger generations the importance of keeping Texas clean and picturesque. Both brands also will work together to host trash cleanups in Texas communities including the “Don’t mess with Texas” Trash-Off statewide cleanup day, which occurs annually in April.

“We want Texas’ roads to be as clean as Buc-ee’s restrooms,” said Buc-ee’s founder/owner Arch “Beaver” Aplin. “Texans are proud of their state and we at Buc-ee’s are proud to be Texan. We look forward to sharing the litter-free message with travelers as they ride along our great Texas highways.”

Texas has been a leader in the battle against litter and the “Don’t mess with Texas” campaign has been vital to this success. However, litter remains a problem in the state. Approximately 362 million pieces of visible litter accumulate on Texas roadways each year. The most common forms of litter are food or organic material, such as banana peels and apple cores, cigarette butts and small pieces of paper, such as receipts and gum wrappers. Those who litter can face a fine starting at $500 and up to $2,000.

About the author

Lorrie Griffith

Lorrie began covering the supermarket and foodservice industries at Shelby Publishing in 1988, an English major fresh out of the University of Georgia. She began as an editorial assistant/proofreader (and continues to proofread everything, everywhere, in spite of herself). She spent three-plus decades with Shelby in various editorial roles, and after a detour into business development, rejoined Shelby in June 2024. "It's good to be back covering the greatest industry in the world," she says.

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